U.S. Supreme Court and the case of the anti-gay wedding cake baker

This issue seems so uniquely American: it involves the unraveling relationship between the Christian Bible and democratic governance, of course, but also the question of whether government or the free market can more effectively structure an orderly society.
 
Posts like this one (screenshot and link below), and especially the comments attached to it, really excite me because you can see the sheep pretty clearly (the ones who submit to someone else’s intellect, ideology and biases) but you can also see the shepherds, too, the ones who use their knowledge of scripture and politics to build ideas that are both nuanced and reasonable.
 
For what it’s worth…
 
1. I didn’t agree with #1 until I read a comment hypothetically requesting of a Jewish baker a cake that celebrates Hitler. Or, a little closer to home, the request of a Native baker a cake that celebrates Andrew Jackson or Sir John A MacDonald. OR… the request of a gay baker a cake that celebrates Focus on the Family (wait: didn’t that happen on an episode of 2 Broke Girls?). And I believe, too, that the free market eventually pans out the racist/bigots/etc, especially (if only) in America.
 
2. Now that I’m on board with #1, I get the whole “freedom of association” piece now. I’d prefer that all racist/bigoted business owners fly a flag announcing it, so I’ll know to avoid them. Otherwise, thanks to a government directive, I’ll buy my gay cake (and win the battle) while they’ll spend their profit—my money—supporting causes against my entire being and livelihood (and win the war).
 
3. No idea what Jesus would’ve done, but I’m swayed by the thought that (a) He would’ve baked the cake because He’s cool with the gays and this isn’t even an issue; or if you believe homosexuality is a sin, that (b) He would’ve baked the cake, then befriended and enlightened the sinner in order to show him/her/them the path to God. (Having said that… I’ve personally witnessed how the best of intentions here can turn out disastrously, can be entirely counterproductive, but I guess that only proves that none of us is Jesus)